This undated image provided by Lee R. Berger and the University of 

This undated image provided by Lee R. Berger and the University of the Witwatersrand shows a reconstructed skull and jaw of Australopithecus sediba. The newly-studied species lived some 2 million years ago, and it both climbed in trees and walked upright. Scientists are getting a more comprehensive look at the extinct South African creature with an intriguing mix of human-like and primitive traits, but scientists say they still haven't pinned down where it fits on our evolutionary family tree. Results were published in the journal Science on Thursday, April 11, 2013. (AP Photo/University of the Witwatersrand, Lee R. Berger)
Associated Press
This undated image provided by Lee R. Berger and the University of the Witwatersrand shows a reconstructed skull and jaw of Australopithecus sediba. The newly-studied species lived some 2 million years ago, and it both climbed in trees and walked upright. Scientists are getting a more comprehensive look at the extinct South African creature with an intriguing mix of human-like and primitive traits, but scientists say they still haven't pinned down where it fits on our evolutionary family tree. Results were published in the journal Science on Thursday, April 11, 2013. (AP Photo/University of the Witwatersrand, Lee R. Berger)
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